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Data Governance Deep Dives - Energy Data Coops

| February 01, 2021

Notes from our third data governance deep dive session Every month Digital Commoners together with the Aapti Institute hosts Data Governance Deep Dives. An informal session that connects practitioners and theorists, while we together explore real-world data governance models.

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Data Trusts: Why, What, and How

Anouk Ruhaak | November 20, 2019

How do we, the general public, gain greater control over the estimated 2.5 quintillion bytes of data that is recorded, stored, processed and analysed, every day? For the moment, we have little say over what can be collected, accessed and used, and by whom. Nor do we enjoy much agency over the ways social platforms study and steer our behaviors. Let’s take Uber, if Uber does something you — a regular user — do not like, this isn’t something Uber views as up for discussion. Your only recourse is to delete the app. Your act of defiance is unlikely to have a large impact. If you can even afford to that is; what if Uber was your only way to get to work?

Blog

Data Governance Deep Dives - Health Data Coops

| November 01, 2019

Notes from our first data governance deep dive session Every month Digital Commoners together with the Aapti Institute hosts Data Governance Deep Dives. An informal session that connects practitioners and theorists, while we together explore real-world data governance models.

Blog

Could consent champions help us navigate privacy concerns?

Anouk Ruhaak and Joshua McKenty | June 24, 2019

“If no one reads the terms and conditions, how can they continue to be the backbone of the internet?” asks the New York Times editorial board in an article titled ‘How Silicon Valley puts the ‘con’ in consent’. Despite data protection laws becoming commonplace, we have yet to find consent models beyond those that rely on individual users blindly clicking ‘Agree’ or opting into cookies they hardly understand. Online consent is severely broken and the wreckage extends beyond the impossible-to-navigate cookie banners. Helen Nissenbaum argues that the model of notice-and-consent is inherently flawed as we can never fully understand the repercussions of data about us being used in different contexts: